Texas & New Mexico

April 2017

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From the Great Plains of the north, to the subtropical banks of the Lower Rio-Grande . . . and from the pineywoods and cypress swamps of the east, to the dry canyons and deserts of the west . . . Texas is unique in its biodiversity. And yet today, it is a very different place from what it was a century ago. Ruralisation and changes in farming, ranching and lumber production have shaped the land, creating a Texas much unlike its past self, and animals that were once common are now endangered or severely reduced in distribution. 

With my friend Mohammad and on my own, I photographed some of the iconic fauna and flora of the Lone Star State. I was especially drawn to species that originate from Louisiana (east), Mexico (south-west) and New Mexico (north-west) and that have adapted over time to Texas's harsh environments.

Black-Tailed Jackrabbit
Soaptree Yucca
Green Heron
Black-Tailed Prairie-Dog
Strawberry Pitaya
Buff-Bellied Hummingbird
Rosemary sp.
Soaptree Yucca
Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck
Black-Tailed Jackrabbits
Bison
Black-Tailed Prairie-Dog
Black-Throated Sparrow
Leopard Frog
Soaptree Yucca
Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron
Plain Chachalaca
Bison
Darkling Beetle
Tree and Dunes
White-Crowned Sparrow
Green Heron
Sand Dunes
Snowy Egret
Buff-Bellied Hummingbird
Black-Tailed Prairie-Dog
Grass and Dunes
Pyrrhuloxia
Northern Cardinal
Trees and Dunes
Great-Crested Flycatcher
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Strawberry Pitaya
Rosemary sp.
Sand Dunes
Soaptree Yucca
Cloudscape
Black-Tailed Jackrabbits
Black-Tailed Jackrabbit
Vermilion Flycatcher and Jackrabbits
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck
Green Heron
Black-Necked Stilt